CrimeDivas

Female White-Collar Crime Divas-Mordern Day Thieves

A Real Second Chance!

chains

I came across this story that I felt was well worth reposting. In America, millions are permanently barred for life for their non-violent crimes. I’m sure if they could, they would never have done. However, after fulfilling their sentence they are haunted for life, tagged as a convict. It’s not so much that they want to wish it away. What happened cannot be changed, but that does not keep that person that individual from learning from their lesson and becoming a better person. A person, who should be given a second chance, without having the shackles and chains from the past, to live a productive life …one free from limits because any citizen would automatically have.

I have read countless crime stories where readers have submitted their ‘cold-hearted’ comments. The comments often make me think about the hatred the mobs displayed when they were deciding to crucify Christ. I don’t understand it! However, one woman will get a new lease on life after a federal judge expunged her criminal record. This person was not a killer, nor a rapist, or a violent individual, and there are millions others whose situation is similar who deserves a second chance too. I think it is time for the federal government to enact legislations that will allow those who have served their time to be able to have their records expunged, so they can have a second chance on life also!

REPOST

For the first time anyone knows of, a judge has expunged a woman’s criminal record because it was ruining her career.  

A judge in Brooklyn has expunged the criminal record of a woman he convicted of fraud 14 years ago, after learning it was preventing her from holding a job.

The woman, a mother of five only known as Jane Doe, was found guilty in 2002 of faking injuries from a car accident and attempting to collect insurance money. For the 13 years following her conviction, she has unable to hold on to a job, because her employers would eventually find out about her conviction, and fire her.

“She doesn’t lie to her employers, who do not ask her if she has a criminal record at the hiring stage,” U.S. District Court Judge John Gleeson, who originally convicted the woman, wrote in his expungement decision, which came last week. “However, after she gets jobs, record checks are performed by her employers or others acting on their behalf. Once they learn of Doe’s conviction, she gets fired. This has happened to her half a dozen times.”

In October, the woman filed an application asking that the conviction be expunged. Eight months later, he approved the petition. Gleeson wrote in his decision:

Even if one believes, as I do, that employers are generally entitled to know about the past convictions of job applicants, and that their decisions based on those convictions are entitled to deference, there will nevertheless be cases in which all reasonable employers would conclude that the conviction is no longer a meaningful consideration in determining suitability for employment if only they had the time and the resources to conduct a thorough investigation of the applicant or employee.

“I have conducted such an investigation, and this is one of those cases,” he went on.

In an interview with Fusion, the woman’s lawyer, Bernard H. Udell, said he and his client accepted the decision “with tearful glee.”

“He did a really good thing,” Udell said. “It’s not something done very often, if at all.”

It was not immediately clear what kind of precedent there is for this decision in New York, let alone a federal case; the New York State Bar did not immediately return a request for comment. The story was first reported by the Wall Street Journal‘s Joe Palazzolo, who quotes a former Justice Department pardon official that this is the first case she’s heard of in which a judge unilaterally decided to expunge a valid conviction.

But it is well known that millions of individuals have had their lives essentially ruined by arrest records that haunt them years after they’ve served their time.

Here’s Judge Gleeson’s decision, which was issued late last week.

Doe-v-US.pdf

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